Family Caregiver Interactive Information Series

“transitions in Palliative Care: symptom management and Psychosocial support” 
thursday, january 20, 2022 | 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Presented by Anita Mehta, RN, PhD, CFT & Dr. Desanka Kovacina

 

The transition from active care to palliative care can be challenging for family members. This means that how they care for their loved one changes. The symptoms they have to manage can increase and become harder to manage. They may not always understand these changes and the care involved can be overwhelming. 

 

This talk will address the main symptoms family caregivers are managing at home and will suggest how to manage them. It will also address what to do when faced with symptoms that are difficult to manage and who to reach out to and when to do so. Finally, this interactive session will focus on some of the important psychosocial implications of taking on the responsibility of symptom management in the role of a family caregiver and provide an opportunity for you to share your experience.

Register now

All participants will receive a Zoom link prior to the session. For any questions, 

contact Nicole Lapointe: nlapointe@tdpcr.ca

are you a family caregiver? this series will interest you!

Being a family caregiver can be as challenging as it is rewarding. If you are a family caregiver looking after someone with a chronic illness please join us for this series of informative conversations over the course of the next six months. Each session will be led by members of the Montreal Institute for Palliative Care professional team. Our team has a wide range in expertise on caring with compassion, supporting family members, and managing illness. This is an excellent forum to learn, exchange ideas, and connect with others who may have caregiving stories that resonate with your own. These sessions are all FREE and will be conducted interactively online. 

 

 

 

 

 

ALL SESSIONS

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Are you interested in learning about Advanced Care Planning? Did you know that family members are increasingly caring for chronically ill loved one at home. This may raise concerns and questions related to what happens as health starts to decline. Many Canadians have not heard of advanced care planning (ACP). Advanced care planning is a process of reflecting on and communicating your wishes for end of life care with your family, close friends and health care team.

This interactive session will focus on what ACP is, how to introduce the subject and make difficult decisions and will be an opportunity for you to ask us questions.

Family members are increasingly caring for chronically ill people at home. This can often be simultaneously challenging and rewarding which can create mixed emotions for many people. Changing roles and expectations will be discussed as well as your readiness for the responsibility. In addition, each caregiver attributes a different meaning to how being a family caregiver defines them and their relationship with their loved one. This is not often examined or discussed yet holds important value to how someone can perceive and respond to their role as a family caregiver. This interactive session will focus on some of the important implications of taking on the role of a family caregiver and provide an opportunity for you to share your experience.

 

Family members are increasingly caring for chronically ill people at home. This care may sometimes consist of both physical and emotional challenges. It is not surprising that as a result, family caregivers often experience distress related to their experiences. They continue to place priority on their loved one, often at a cost to their own physical and mental health. It becomes difficult for them to recognize their need for self-care and the need to

respect those needs.

This interactive session will focus on recognizing when caring for yourself becomes critical and will address the challenges of caring for someone while trying to balance care for yourself.

The transition from active care to palliative care can be challenging for family members. This means that how they care for their loved one changes. The symptoms they have to manage can increase and become harder to manage. They may not always understand these changes and the care involved can be overwhelming. This talk will address the main symptoms family caregivers are managing at home and will suggest how to manage them. It will also address what to do when faced with symptoms that are difficult to manage and who to reach out to and when to do so. Finally, this interactive session will focus on some of the important psychosocial implications of taking on the responsibility of symptom management in the role of a family caregiver and provide an opportunity for you to share your experience.

When a family member is unwell the caregiver is often witness to multiple changes in the well-being, functional status and overall health of their loved one. When the illness is chronic and progresses, there are many losses that both the patient and their caregivers must cope with. Grief can be experienced along the entire illness trajectory depending highlighting the fact that a family caregiver’s mood needs to be constantly assessed. In addition, bereavement can be complicated after a loved one passes away as the family caregiver tries to adapt to the loss of the patient, their role, and the structure and

routine caregiving provided. This interactive session will focus on some of the some of the possible losses, the grieving of those losses and how to care for oneself during bereavement.

It can be challenging explaining chronic illness and death in the context of palliative care to children. Families often need support in understanding how to talk to their children, what to explain to them, and how to answer their questions and concerns related to death and dying. It is important to recognize that honesty, creativity and being present are key concepts when supporting children as they cope with someone they love being ill. This interactive session will focus on supporting families with children in the context of chronic illness. It will highlight how to introduce the subject of palliative care in a manner that is consistent with a child’s developmental level and ability to process the information. You can use this opportunity to ask us questions or to share and discuss your own experiences.

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